Author: St. Elizabeth Healthcare

Hepatitis A: What You Need to Know Hepatitis A – What is it and how do you get it? It’s easy to get confused about hepatitis. There are numerous types of hepatitis, but the three most common are: Hepatitis A Hepatitis B Hepatitis C Hepatitis A is a viral infection that affects the liver. The patient experiences flu-like symptoms, including nausea, fatigue, fever, stomach pain, loss of appetite, dark urine, pale stool and jaundice (yellowish skin and eyes). Hepatitis A is spread by direct contact with an infected person, including fecal-oral (if someone hasn’t washed their hands after using the…

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What the Ringing in Your Ears Is Trying to Tell You Do you hear a ringing or a buzzing in your ear? Are you having a hard time concentrating or focusing because you hear a noise no one else can hear? You could have tinnitus, a common condition affecting about one in five people. Dr. Stacey Woods, AuD., CCC-A, a Doctor of Audiology with ENT & Allergy Specialists explains, “Some people complain of a classic ringing in the ears, other people describe it as a background “whoosh” sound, crickets or clicking sounds. You may experience it constantly or it could be…

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6 Myths About Certified Nurse-Midwives Midwives are an essential part of the St. Elizabeth Physicians Women’s Health team and The Family Birth Place community. National Midwifery Week is September 30 through October 6, 2018, and at St. Elizabeth Healthcare, we know that our certified nurse-midwives make a difference each and every day. Certified Nurse-Midwives: The Myths Below are a few of the most frequently heard myths about certified nurse-midwives. Take a look and see firsthand how our certified nurse-midwives offer a unique and comprehensive range of services to the women in the Northern Kentucky community. Myth: Midwives only perform home births. The certified nurse-midwives…

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Physical Therapy After a Joint Replacement to Get the Most from Your New Joint So you finally did it — you decided you were done living in pain, and you had joint replacement surgery. Make sure you get the most from your new joint by listening to your physical therapist and participating in your rehabilitation. Krista D. Knapke, PT, MPT, a Physical Therapist at St. Elizabeth Healthcare, says, “Physical therapy immediately after surgery helps your long-term mobility, and it ensures you are moving safely on your new joint.” Physical Therapy in the Hospital Getting moving is so important to your new…

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Women and Stroke: The Facts Are Alarming According to the Centers for Disease Control, one in five women in the United States will have a stroke in her lifetime. Nearly 50 percent of first-time strokes occur in women and 60 percent of stroke deaths are in women. Stroke kills twice as many women as breast cancer and is the third leading cause of death for women. Those statistics are enough to grab anyone’s attention. Dr. Alexander Hou, Vascular Surgeon at St. Elizabeth Physicians says, “The good news is 80 percent of strokes can be prevented by reducing your risks. And if…

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Did you know that in the U.S., prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men? It is also 100 percent treatable if it’s detected early. September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. Each year, the Step Up for Blue campaign highlights the importance of regular prostate screenings. St. Elizabeth Cancer Care participates in Prostate Cancer Awareness Month by encouraging and empowering men to schedule an appointment with their primary care physician for a screening. More than 3 million men in the U.S. are currently living with prostate cancer. New Prostate Cancer Screening on the Horizon Research is ongoing to…

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As the fall sports season swings into full gear, many athletes are thinking about training and conditioning so they can prevent a season-ending ACL injury. ACL stands for Anterior Cruciate Ligament and it connects your thigh bone and shin bone, running through your knee. According to the American Academy of Orthopedic Surgeons, football, basketball, soccer and downhill skiers who participate in competitive games have an increased risk for ACL injuries. The biggest myth for preventing ACL injury is you need to have strong knees Kathy Boehmer PT, MHS, SCS, ATC, Specialty Program Coordinator Sports Medicine, for St. Elizabeth Healthcare, emphasizes…

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Core Strength—The Key to Balance and Overall Function Do you feel uncoordinated when you are carrying the laundry basket down stairs? Are you uneasy as you use the step stool to reach the top shelf? Or are you constantly avoiding any risk because you are afraid you may hurt yourself? Those are all normal as you age, but you can avoid those worries if you do one thing—strengthen your core. In September, we recognize balance awareness week even though balance is something so many people take for granted. Kathy Boehmer PT, MHS, SCS, ATC, Specialty Program Coordinator for St. Elizabeth…

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Many women prefer fashion over function. You squeeze your feet into your three-inch stilettos to look great in your little black dress. Or wear pumps to work every day to look more polished in your suit. But have you stopped to consider you could be doing lasting damage to your feet? Dr. James Morrow a Podiatrist with St. Elizabeth Physicians, agree that while high heels may look cute, there are several injuries they could cause. Foot and toe pain—The angle a high-heel shoe puts your foot in could cause short-term or even chronic pain. Dr. Morrow says, “The influence of…

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Your sweet, snuggly baby has just arrived and you are basking in all their newborn wonder. They look perfect and they are acting like a brand-new baby should – so why undergo the newborn screening when everything seems normal? “Every child – even those who look perfectly healthy at birth – needs to have the newborn screening,” says Teri Wilde, Nurse Manager for Mother Baby Postpartum at St. Elizabeth Healthcare. “The screening can detect conditions that are not visible at birth. Many of the illnesses that are included in the screening are rare, but early intervention and sometimes life-saving treatment…

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